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STATE LIBRARIAN NAMED AS ANTHONY H. BENOIT AWARD WINNER

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Rebecca Hamilton, State LibrarianThe Louisiana Library Association presented State Librarian Rebecca Hamilton with the Anthony H. Benoit Award at their 2012 conference in Shreveport. The award is presented annually to an LLA member in the middle of their career who has made outstanding contributions to librarianship.

Since becoming the state librarian in 2005, Hamilton has helped the library increase the Louisiana Book Festival attendance to more than 25,000 and secured an $8.8 million federal Broadband Technology Opportunities grant to further the library’s mission. Hamilton oversaw the rebuilding of the Library’s internal network and backup systems, a 3‐year project that was confirmed a success during the Hurricane Gustav in 2008. The State Library never lost Internet connectivity while all other state government offices in Baton Rouge were offline. Hamilton also obtained a $12 million grant to provide temporary library facilities after storms in both Louisiana and Mississippi.

Hamilton is Louisiana’s fourth State Librarian in the agency’s 85-year history and the youngest State Librarian in the nation.

www.LouisianaTravel.com


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
April 23, 2012

Contact:
Paulita Chartier
State Library of Louisiana
225.342.9713
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Jacques Berry
Office of the Lieutenant Governor
225.342.8607
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STATE LIBRARY ANNOUNCES 2012 LOUISIANA READERS’ CHOICE AWARD WINNERS

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Nearly 27,000 students throughout the state voted to choose the winners of the 2012 Louisiana Young Readers’ Choice Award and Louisiana Teen Readers’ Choice Award. The Dunderheads by Paul Fleischman and illustrated by David Roberts was the top choice of third through fifth graders while 11 Birthdays by Wendy Mass received the most votes from middle school students. This is the first year to have ninth through 12th grade students participating. The Louisiana Teen Readers’ Choice Award for 2012 goes to Hate List by Jennifer Brown.

Nearly 2,000 Louisiana high school students participated in this inaugural year by reading close to 4,000 books this year.

“The State Library of Louisiana’s expansion of the Louisiana Young Readers’ Choice program allows our state’s high school students to have a voice in the recognition of great literature,” Lt. Governor Jay Dardenne said. “Students can now participate in this literacy program from elementary school through graduation, taking those skills of independent reading with them.”

Voting day is an exciting time in many schools and libraries throughout Louisiana as students cast their votes, sometimes using voting machines supplied by the Secretary of State’s Voter Outreach Division.

“We began this program 13 years ago in an effort to pursue one of the core missions of the State Library of Louisiana—to foster a culture of literacy in our citizens beginning with our children,” State Librarian Rebecca Hamilton said. “We know that once our children become readers they can achieve much more throughout their formal education.”

The Louisiana Young Readers’ Choice Award is a reading enrichment program of the State Library of Louisiana underwritten by Dr. James R. and Ann A. Peltier with additional support by PermaBound Books. It is a model collaborative reading program involving students, teachers and public librarians in all regions of the state.

For information about the program including previous winners and this year’s second place winners, as well as a list of books nominated for next year’s awards visit www.state.lib.la.us and click on Literacy and Reading, then on Louisiana Young Readers’ Choice Award.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
MARCH 21, 2012

Contact:

 

Paulita Chartier
State Library of Louisiana
225.342.9713
This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Jacques Berry
Office of the Lieutenant Governor
225.342.8607
This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 

STATE LETTERS ABOUT LITERATURE WRITING COMPETITION WINNERS

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The State Library’s Louisiana Center for the Book is announcing the state winners of the Letters About Literature competition, a national reading-writing contest, sponsored by Library of Congress Center for the Book and Target, that asks students to write a personal letter to an author or poet, living or dead, explaining how that writer's work impacted the students’ lives or worldviews. The Letters About Literature national headquarters received 787 entries from Louisiana students. From these, the top letters in each grade level were chosen as Louisiana’s finalists and forwarded to the Louisiana Center for the Book.  Winning entries for each level were then selected by a panel of judges comprising teachers and librarians from across the state and the first place letter in each grade level was then returned to LAL Central where national winners will be announced in the spring.

The Louisiana winners of the competition from throughout the state are listed below.

Level I (grades 4 – 6)
1st Place: Ella Frantzen, individual entry, Lafayette
2nd Place: Emma Gruesbeck, NSU Laboratory School, Natchitoches
Teacher: Lisa Wiggins
3rd Place: Asia Pikes, NSU Laboratory School, Natchitoches
Teacher: Lisa Wiggins
Level II (grades 7 – 8)
1st Place: Imogen Hoffman, Ursuline Academy, New Orleans
Teacher: Katie Gremillion
2nd Place: Olivia Gower, Our Lady of Fatima, Lafayette
Teacher: Jean Doucet
3rd Place: Olivia Parker, Baton Rouge International School
Teacher: Amanda Ford
Level III (grades 9 – 12)
1st Place: Lea Trusty, Destrehan High School
Teacher: Lynn Thompson
2nd Place: Samantha Barnes, Northshore High School, Slidell
Teacher: Catherine Tanguis
3rd Place: Rebecca Aaron, Bolton High School, Alexandria
Teacher: Nancy Monroe

Ella Frantzen, Level 1 first-place winner, wrote to Old Yeller author Fred Gipson: “I love to read because reading takes me away. When I read your book, though, it did not take me anywhere. It brought me home.”

Writing to author Avi about The True Confessions of Charlotte Doyle, Level 2 winner Imogen Hoffman said: “Thank you for writing a book that helped me to understand that a girl is not limited by the ideas that others have of her. She can only be limited by the idea she has of herself.”

The Level 3 winner, Lea Trusty, wrote to Jane Austen: “The most important tool reading provided me with was a consciousness of the importance of literacy. Both of my parents were immigrants, in search of greater opportunities and a better education when coming to America. Yet, I had not fully understood the blessings of my own education until I fell in love with reading. I finally understood what a book was: the power of knowledge, and the responsibility of using it to better the world around me. For this, and so much more, I have you to thank for your dedication to writing, despite the odds, leading to your life-changing work, Pride and Prejudice.”

The Louisiana Writing Project serves as a partner in the state Letters About Literature contest.  For a complete list of this year’s winners and finalists, visit www.state.lib.la.us.

www.LouisianaTravel.com

 


 

LAL 2012 1st, 2nd and 3rd Place Letters

 

Level  I - 1st Place

Dear Mr. Gipson,

I am writing to you about your book, Old Yeller. I discovered the book in our school library before the holiday. I love dogs and wanted to read about Old Yeller, because the book’s cover had a cool picture of a cute boy and a friendly dog.

I thought your book would make me laugh, but it made me cry. I really felt like I could relate to Travis, because I have a little sister who is always bugging me like Arliss, but I love her anyway. I also have a dog, Zoe, that I love very much, and I could not imagine having to kill Zoe.

Your book connected very much with my life because, when I was little, I lived in New Orleans. When Hurricane Katrina hit New Orleans, we moved away to a new town, but I never really felt like I was at home here because I never really got to say goodbye to my old friends. It seemed like my closest friends were all dead because I couldn’t speak to them and I couldn’t see them – they moved away, too.

Your book made me feel like it is okay to start over and it is okay not to know where to turn next. And it is okay to lose something you love. It taught me that losing things and dying are a part of life. And, like the brown, speckled pup in Old Yeller that started a new adventure, life of all kinds starts over again but just a little bit different.

Mr. Gipson, I love to read because reading takes me away. When I read your book, though, it did not take me anywhere. It brought me home. Thank you very much.

Sincerely,

Ella Frantzen

 


Level  I - 2nd Place

 

January 9, 2012

Dear Norton Juster,

Your book, The Phantom Tollbooth, has changed my idea of learning completely. When I was younger, I was very similar to Milo. I hated school. My worst enemies were our subjects. To me our teachers were speaking a foreign language. Both my heart and my mind felt the same way about school: who cares about it?

A few years later, just like how the tollbooth appeared in Milo’s room, a teal book with a gold font appeared on my desk. I normally would have just asked if we could do this assignment later. But everyone was already reading! Not wanting to be left behind, I had no choice but to open your book and read.

Soon, I was in the little electric car with Milo, speeding through the the tollbooth and into a strange and wonderful land. I became confused when I met the Whether Man, and left Expectations only to become stuck in the Doldrums. Then, making room for Tock, we carried on to Dictionopolis and added the Humbug to our party. The whole time, from starting out as strangers to ending as heroes, I didn’t even realize we were learning.

Now, in fifth grade, my opinion of learning is completely different. Learning isn’t boring. Learning is magical. It is an adventure of ups and downs, numbers and letters, and surprises. How silly I was, in first and second grade, to not understand. If it weren’t for you book with the teal cover and the golden title, I never would have understood the gift of learning.

Thank you,

Emma Gruesbeck

 


Level  I – 3rd Place

Dear Barbara Drawhorn,

Your book Maddie “Waaa” affected me in so many ways. When you are the oldest, sometimes you want your personal items left alone. Maddie is always messing with Tierra’s things, and I too experience the same thing. I get upset just like Tierra does; I hate when my little sister messes with my belongings.

This book helps me realize that this is normal for your little sister to mess with your things, and even though it is normal it still makes me want to slap her silly now and then. But I do that anyway.

T’unna will have me fast on my heels screaming, give me my markers or sunflower seeds, and when she doesn’t give it back to me then I want to beat her up. Now I realize that I need to at least try to be a little more patient with T’unna instead of screaming at her.

It teaches me a better way to get along with my sister and allow her to respect my things.

I realized that it is important to try and solve the problem before she starts screaming and howling, because it takes awhile to get her to stop crying. Once again I want to slap her senseless but I know that is not the right thing to do.

It’s always good to read a book that helps you learn how to deal with situations. It’s good to know that the characters in the book are just like me and my family. It taught me that my family is very well normal and the problems with my little sister can be easily solved. A little more patience with her because of her age and less slapping her senseless will allow us to grow closer.

Sincerely,

Asia Pikes


Level II – 1st Place

Dear Mr. Avi,

It was that time of year again. You know, when students are forced to do the Summer Reading List. I have always purchased books that were not too long or boring. I had it down to a science, especially the part where I got the high grade, without letting the book get inside me. Read the book. Write the report. Get the “A.” Then onto the bookshelf it went, one more award-winning book added to my collection. But The True Confessions of Charlotte Doyle was amazingly different. I never knew books could be so powerful.  As I flipped through, I had an urge to read on that I couldn’t resist. At first I was fascinated because sea stories are always about boys, but this one said it was about a thirteen-year-old girl. Then the front-page warning said: “If strong ideas and actions offend you, read no more.”  I thought “a suspenseful book about a girl at sea?” I was sold. It was like the book was waiting for me. But what I didn’t know was that the world of reading for me would never be the same.

At first, Charlotte seemed terribly different from me. This helped to keep myself out of the story. She behaved as a girly-girl who judged people by their appearances. She only showed them the girl they wanted to see. Then her character started to grow on me as she struggled alone, while the plot twisted and turned. She was afraid. I knew what her fear felt like. Every girl knows what that feels like. You want to show your real self, but will people except you? At my new school, I was comfortable as the straight “A” student. It was something I was good at. But making friends was harder. Charlotte opens up to Zachariah, showing her true self, just as I began to let others see me. Not trusting people is something Charlotte and I have in common. Slowly I started connecting with her, everything she was thinking and feeling. Her thoughts became mine. I wanted to warn her at times. I kept getting lost in the book, like it was my story.

I haven’t read anything that let me experience myself before. I never knew writing could have that purpose. Outside Charlotte, I would never have the courage to take on Jaggery. Inside her, I was capable of anything. I was in the storm too, challenged what Jaggery thought of a “girl,” and accepted the crew making us captain. This made me wonder if writers know the impact words have on readers. When books get inside the hidden parts of you, like this one does, does it stay a part of you forever?

Halfway through, I discovered there was more to Charlotte than she could keep hidden any longer. I feel  this all the time. I recently made a hard decision to move schools. I needed to leave behind friends to explore my talents and interests.

I found Charlotte smart and courageous, back in history when women and minorities were shown they were of little value. By the end, she and Zachariah proved that idea wrong. For Charlotte, leaving the life she knew changed her forever. Her “true confessions” became her new story. For me, the decision to step into my future, with a change of direction, is just the beginning of mine.

Thank you for writing a book that helped me to understand that a girl is not limited by the ideas that others have of her.  She can only be limited by the idea she has of herself.

Sincerely,

Imogen Hoffman


Level II – 2nd Place

Dear Margaret Peterson Haddix,

I just finished reading your book Among the Hidden. Like Luke and Jen, I am a third child and being the third child your book had me wondering. What if it were against the law to have more than two children today? If so, would my parents be brave enough to have me? Once here, would they give me up to the government out of fear or would they be brave enough to hide me? I cannot imagine a parent having to make that kind of a decision. What if there really was a population police? What would I do?

I don’t think I could accept the fact that I wasn’t allowed to exist. I hope I would have the courage like Jen to rebel. Well, I’m not really sure if I would be brave enough to rebel and take the chance of being killed, because I’m such a “scaredy-cat,” but I know I would not want to stay in hiding my entire life. To stay in hiding would mean I couldn’t go to most of the places I go to like school, church, friend’s houses, and even outside to play. Like Luke, I would be so curious to explore the world, and as a third child, I would not have that freedom. I’m like Jen; I consider myself a leader. I like to take charge.  I would like to think I could organize a rally to stand up for my right to life.

What I don’t understand is how anyone could deny the life of a child. How could you kill an innocent child? Would this be the answer to a food shortage? I would hope that our society would never allow this to happen, but like in the book the government may think that it is necessary. Maybe we should think about conserving our resources so that it is not necessary to ever have such an unfair law.

Well, I enjoyed reading the book and can’t wait to read Among the Imposters.

Sincerely,

Olivia Gower 


Level II -3rd Place

Dear Mrs. Collins,

My name is Olivia and I am 12 years old. I have loved to read for my entire life and I love books that engulf me. At least twenty people had recommended your The Hunger Games trilogy to me, so I went to a small bookstore near my house one day and bought the first book. After I paid, I bought a soda from the vending machine outside and went back in.

I found a comfy beanbag chair in a quiet corner and started to read. It was about 2:00 then. I read, read, read, and read for four hours. Even when I had to use the bathroom, I brought the book with me! I just couldn’t stop! At 6:00, closing time, I begged and begged the store owner to let me stay, but I couldn’t. I grabbed my stuff and walked out. My eyes were glued to the book the entire walk home. I didn’t even greet my dad who had been away on business for a week when I got home. I just went straight to my room and kept reading.

At about midnight, I finished The Hunger Games. I stayed up thinking about how much the book changed me. How much more thankful I am for what I have, and how glad I am that I’m not living in Panem. I also thought about how much Katniss is just like me. My younger sister and I are the same age difference as Katniss and Prim; I love her unconditionally. I’m also adventurous. I feel that the whole plot of the book reflects similar, but less drastic, conflicts in my life, like choosing between two people that I like.

The whole rebellion inspired me. I love how the people of Panem stand up for what they believe in when they’ve had enough. It actually made me stand up at school when a pretty severe issue came up. My friends and I wrote a letter to the administration, and even though it took a lot of convincing; they finally decided to do something about it.

One thing that really changed my perspective on the world was Rue. A sweet, smart, spry, nifty, innovative survivor of a girl. Innocent. Killed. I cried for days. My Mom even considered taking the book away from me because I couldn’t handle it. I have loved my sister and everyone I know even more than I had before.

The death of Finnick in Mockingjay also really touched me. He loved Annie so much, only to be killed. When Katniss begged to go back and couldn’t, I was broken. Another thing in Mockingjay that moved me was when Katniss was on the balcony of the President’s mansion and she was supposed to shoot President Snow, but instead shot President Coin. It made me reassess who my friends and enemies were. I have actually made new friends because of it!

This trilogy was a rollercoaster ride. It would peak, dip, spiral, crash, burn, loop, corkscrew, and climb. I was always swamped into the plot, as if I was in the arena with Katniss. I LOVED IT!!!!!!

I appreciate the time that you put into writing you novels, not to mention effort and sheer talent. You have touched so many people, including me, with your writings. By the way, my friends and I have already gotten our Hunger Games T-shirts, and are going to see the movie when it comes out! We can’t wait!!!

Once again, thank you for writing these books. They really have made me a better person. Please respond if you can!!

 

Sincerely,

Olivia Parker


Level III – 1st Place

Dear Ms. Austen,

I have a dangerous confession, Ms. Austen. The first ten years of my life was filled with a passionate loathing for literature. No matter the books I was introduced to, I found them all consistently insipid and uninspiring. My parents often attempted to reform me and, the summer before 6th grade, sentenced me to spend a substantial time at the library. On one particular day, after shuffling through the library’s shelves and finding nothing of interest, I was lounging in a creaky maroon couch, staring at a clock’s hands grudgingly move. I was rudely interrupted by a librarian, a college girl with rimless glasses, pushing the world’s shrillest book cart. Still miffed after she left, I was returning to boredom, when I noticed a forgotten book on the cart. Reluctantly rising, I picked up the book and murmured the title: Pride and Prejudice. Unfamiliar with it, I read the synopsis on the back cover. Surprisingly intrigued, I decided to bring your novel home.

Perhaps it would be difficult to imagine someone’s life changing so immensely in just a matter of days, all by one book. But this very same thing happened to me. By nine o’clock that night, I was fifteen chapters in, snared by a group of baffling women on a daunting yet hilarious journey to marriage. On day two, I was arguing with characters, wondering how Mr. Darcy could be so insensitive, and Elizabeth so blind. By day three, I had finished the book and was stunned that I was actually upset the story was over.  The passion of your characters and the complex yet entertaining plot had intrigued me as no other story I had read ever did. Finally, I had enjoyed reading a book.

Pride and Prejudice was responsible for my burgeoning love affair with literature. I continued to read more of your novels, falling in love with more of your characters, my favorites Emma Woodhouse, who I quickly identified with most as a meddler with good intentions—blind to my own life and love within it—Marianne Dashwood , and Anne Elliot. I also embarked on the works of other British writers like the Bronte sisters and Shakespeare. Not until high school did I discover American literature, easily falling in love with the poetry of Emily Dickenson, eagerly reading bold Tennessee Williams plays. I had discovered the joys of world literature, embarking on novels such as Pale Fire, Waiting, and Madame Bovary.

Still, no matter their genre, all were able to accomplish what reading had never done for me until Pride and Prejudice—bring me to a different time, a fresh place separate from reality, while carrying the characters and the multitude of lessons within their stories into my everyday life. Literature also brought me to a greater passion: journalism. As I grew older, I sought for more diverse forms of writing, and discovered newsmagazines. I was effortlessly able to connect print journalists to the authors I loved so much: they were simply translating an important event, a personal ideal, into words to educate and enthrall. I now strive to better my writing and become a journalist with this skill.

The most important tool reading provided me with was a consciousness of the importance of literacy. Both of my parents were immigrants, in search of greater opportunities and a better education when coming to America. Yet, I had not fully understood the blessings of my own education until I fell in love with reading. I finally understood what a book was: the power of knowledge, and the responsibility of using it to better the world around me. For this, and so much more, I have you to thank for your dedication to writing, despite the odds, leading to your life-changing work, Pride and Prejudice.

Sincerely,

Lea Trusty


Level III – 2nd Place

Dear J.K.  Rowling,

I made the decision to write to you because I really don’t think there has been any series more influential and important in my life that the Harry Potter series. I was two years old when Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone was released in the UK, four years old when it was released in the USA. At four, I vividly remember my older brother reading the book and suggesting to me that I would like it when I was old enough. Being the stubborn toddler that I was, I decided I was old enough that day, and proceeded to sit down on the couch and pour myself into Philosopher’s Stone (known to me then only as the Sorcerer’s Stone). That day, I began to read my first chapter book. That day, I quickly grew to love the characters of a book more than anything. Later that evening, my mother would find me in her bathroom, standing on a stepstool, and using her brown eyeliner to draw a lightning bolt on my forehead.

As the other books in the series would be released over the next 8 years, some of my favorite childhood memories are from going to parties at book stores such as Barnes & Noble to celebrate the release of the new Potter books. My brother and I both had our Harry Potter glasses from Party City (I still have mine, and they still have tape on the bridge), eyeliner-drawn lightning bolt scars, black robes that were really capes that our mother had artfully pinned, and wands made out of rolled up pieces of paper. My friend from school, Emily, began the tradition of having birthday parties for Harry Potter every year. There were Acid Pops and Bertie Bott’s Every Flavor Beans galore, DIY-ed Harry Potter trivia games, and book and movie marathon slumber parties. When Deathly Hallows was released, my brother was in college, so we weren’t able to go to a book store party to honor the occasion. Instead, we pre-ordered the books (one for each of us) from Amazon, and they showed up in our mailbox that afternoon. I stayed up until four in the morning reading it, and I do not ever recall crying as much as I did then. To me, it was more than just the end of a book series – and what a spectacular ending it was – it was the end of something I had grown up with. It felt as if my childhood was ending prematurely.

It’s hard to pinpoint exactly why I love the Harry Potter series as much as I do. It could have been the sheer notion of it – a whole world, right along our own Muggle lives, where witches and wizards were active! Potions and spells! Sports played on brooms! It’s enthralling. It could have been the vividness of the stories – never once, in twelve years of reading this series, have I ever felt like I was being asked to suspend my disbelief. Instead, every sentence, every word, every letter has significance, every point is important, and not once does anything seem out of place. Everything feels as if it belongs. However, I think if I had to name one thing that keeps it so dear to my heart, it would be how much I learned from the series. Harry has to fight off the greatest Dark wizard known to wizarding kind, and yet he always stayed true to his friends, Ron and Hermione. Harry taught me at a young age the importance of fighting for what’s right. Dumbledore taught me to respect my elders, and having someone you can trust is always important. Hermione taught me it was okay to be an overachiever. Ron taught me the importance of friendship. Luna taught me it was okay to be myself. Ginny taught me that dreams really come true. Fred and George showed me the need for levity in dark and difficult times. Voldemort was my perfect example of why evil will never triumph. And you, Ms. Rowling, gave me my love for reading, my most important life lessons, and my most treasured possessions. And for that, I thank you.

Sincerely,

Samantha Barnes


Level III - 3rd Place

Dear Scott Westerfield,

Your novel Uglies exposed me to a dystopian society for the first time. I originally read it in 7th grade and recently re-read it. As a seventeen year old high school junior, I now fully realize the implications of this novel and how easily it could become reality.

When I read this book, I was amazed by the characters’ experiences. The initial descriptions of Tally’s world intrigued me. A world where every person can choose how to change personal experience is compelling and what every young girl dreams of. No child in a junior high setting is satisfied with looks, and I was no exception. Discovering later that Tally’s perfect world was not as it seemed came as a huge shock, though. I had never imagined such deceptions existed. Having grown up in the United States, where the government is for the people, by the people, and of the people, the concept of being against the people is alien to me. Learning that the government could control a person wholeheartedly and change lives stunned me. The implications of government mind control did not hit me until recently.

As a seventeen year old, I can vote in one year and am conscious of my future responsibilities. I am aware of how my vote will influence the way the government is run. However, because the United States is a democratic republic, I cannot vote on every single issue. As I am typing this letter, a bill called  SOPA (Stop Online Piracy Act) is being considered for passage in the U.S. House of Representatives. If passed, certain websites would be completely blocked by the government. If used correctly, it would make it harder to violate copyright privileges online. However, the vague wording of the law might lead to misuse. We have no way to know that what is being blocked is actually in violation of the law. The government can say it is in violation, but if it is not viewable, who can know? Due process would not be involved. The censorship and control that would occur are similar to the way Tally’s government controlled its citizens.

In Tally’s city, the government’s word is taken without question. The result was a world where liberties did not exist. Tally’s discovery of David’s camp came with the discovery of how her rights were violated. The government was suddenly questioned. Today, cosmetic surgery and implant technology exist for the future you have envisioned. The government checks and balances we currently have in place are what keep it from becoming a reality. However, SOPA could be an entry into Tally’s world.

Your novel has made me realize I cannot keep silent when the government tries to infringe upon personal liberties. Because of the potential for losing current liberties, I am writing my representative to vote against this measure. I have also discussed the implications of the act with my friends, and they are writing letters as well.  My involvement with politics will not stop with SOPA. I must remain vigilant and active in preserving our liberties. Uglies made me realize that I have to be aware of what the government is doing before it is too late. One thing leads to another, and without paying attention to politics Tally’s world could soon become my own.

Sincerely,

Rebecca A. Aaron

 


LAL 2012 All Finalists from National

Name 

School

City

Teacher

Level I

Callyn Blanchard

Belle Chasse Academy

Belle Chasse

Lauren Hihar

Jamie Stagg

Copper Mill Elementary School

Zachary

Melinda Trawick

Ashley Roberts

Copper Mill Elementary School

Zachary

Melinda Trawick

Gage Bennett

Copper Mill Elementary School

Zachary

Melinda Trawick

Divya Kasarla

Episcopal School of Acadiana

Lafayette

Anna Gauthier

Chloe Lavoie

Lusher Charter School

New Orleans

Katheryne Patterson

Caleb Rogers

Lusher Charter School

New Orleans

Katheryne Patterson

Regan Keen

NSU Laboratory School

Natchitoches

Lisa Wiggins

Claire Spann

NSU Laboratory School

Natchitoches

Lisa Wiggins

Asia Pikes

NSU Laboratory School

Natchitoches

Lisa Wiggins

Emma Gruesbeck

NSU Laboratory School

Natchitoches

Lisa Wiggins

Kade Dukaric

Runnels Elementary School

Baton Rouge

Lisa Fennell

Kaylen Howe

Runnels Elementary School

Baton Rouge

Lisa Fennell

Raphaella Brown

Ursaline Academy

New Orleans

Katie Gremillion

Eleanor Simmons

Ursaline Academy

New Orleans

Katie Gremillion

Randi Salez

Ursaline Academy

New Orleans

Kitty Graf

Anthony Thompson

individual entry

Natchitoches


Ella Frantzen

individual entry

Lafayette


Bailey Chutz

individual entry

Ventress


Level II

Melissa Sanchez

Baton Rouge International School

Baton Rouge

Amanda Ford

Olivia Parker

Baton Rouge International School

Baton Rouge

Amanda Ford

Maddie Palermo

Brusly Middle School

Brusly

Susan Herrington

Heather Teer

False River Academy

New Roads

Myrna Tuminello

Hunter Teer

False River Academy

New Roads

Myrna Tuminello

Angelle King

Mount Carmel Academy

New Orleans

Jaime Carroll

Katie Wood

Mount Carmel Academy

New Orleans

Jaime Carroll

Whitney Romero

Our Lady of Fatima School

Lafayette

Jean Doucet

Claire Duggs

Our Lady of Fatima School

Lafayette

Jean Doucet

Olivia Gower

Our Lady of Fatima School

Lafayette

Jean Doucet

Lauren Gibson

Ursaline Academy

New Orleans

Katie Gremillion

Yasmeen Magharehabed

Ursaline Academy

New Orleans

Katie Gremillion

Allison Hoss

Ursaline Academy

New Orleans

Katie Gremillion

Imogen Hoffman

Ursaline Academy

New Orleans

Katie Gremillion

Sydney Kethley

St. Mark's Cathedral School

Shreveport

John Cosey

Olivia Tidwell

individual entry

Lafayette


Level III

Maria Morris

Archbishop Hannan High School

Lafayette

Ashley Puntila

Brandon Keim

Archbishop Hannan High School

Lafayette

Ashley Puntila

Anthony Caronna

Archbishop Hannan High School

Lafayette

Ashley Puntila

Mike Hess

Archbishop Hannan High School

Lafayette

Ashley Puntila

Matthew Musso

Archbishop Hannan High School

Lafayette

Ashley Puntila

Angelica Gonzalez

Baton Rouge International School

Baton Rouge

Amanda Ford

John Tumbaco

Bolton High School

Alexandria

Nancy Monroe

Eleanor Jurgensen

Bolton High School

Alexandria

Nancy Monroe

Rebecca Aaron

Bolton High School

Alexandria

Nancy Monroe

Sophie Lipman

Bolton High School

Alexandria

Nancy Monroe

Sonja Daniels

Bolton High School

Alexandria

Nancy Monroe

Monika Daniels

Bolton High School

Alexandria

Nancy Monroe

Abigail Bumgardner

C. E. Byrd High School

Shreveport

Debrah Guillot

Tyler Eddlemon

C. E. Byrd High School

Shreveport

Debrah Guillot

Cody Kennemer

C. E. Byrd High School

Shreveport

Debrah Guillot

Jin Lee

C. E. Byrd High School

Shreveport

Cathy Sledge

Valencia Richardson

C. E. Byrd High School

Shreveport

Cathy Sledge

Stormy Sanders

C. E. Byrd High School

Shreveport

Cathy Sledge

Cole Smith

C. E. Byrd High School

Shreveport

Cathy Sledge

Jordan Green

C. E. Byrd High School

Shreveport

Cathy Sledge

Jonathan Ratliff

C. E. Byrd High School

Shreveport

Kathy O'Neal

Rachel McClure

C. E. Byrd High School

Shreveport

Kathy O'Neal

Remi Locke

C. E. Byrd High School

Shreveport

Kathy O'Neal

Spencer Tindel

Captain Shreve High School

Shreveport

Maureen Barclay

Danielle Durr

Captain Shreve High School

Shreveport

Maureen Barclay

Chelsea Stelly

Carencro High School

Lafayette

Anna Marquardt

Kayla Howard

Carencro High School

Lafayette

Anna Marquardt

Quincy Walker

DeRidder High School

DeRidder

Melinda Shirley

Roy Eberlan

DeRidder High School

DeRidder

Melinda Shirley

DaMika Woodard

DeRidder High School

DeRidder

Melinda Shirley

Lea Trusty

Destrehan High School

Destrehan

Lisa Thompson

Hannah Wilson

Destrehan High School

Destrehan

Lisa Thompson

Morgan Baudoin

Hahnville High School

Boutte

Deborah Unger

Seth Champagne

Hahnville High School

Boutte

Deborah Unger

Daniel Levy

Hahnville High School

Boutte

Deborah Unger

Kathryn Prendergast

Hahnville High School

Boutte

Deborah Unger

Cassandra Morgan

Northshore High School

Slidell

Catherine Tanguis

Samantha Barnes

Northshore High School

Slidell

Catherine Tanguis

Megan Krewsky

Northshore High School

Slidell

Catherine Tanguis

Nicole Thonn

Northshore High School

Slidell

Catherine Tanguis

Madison Rankin

Northshore High School

Slidell

Catherine Tanguis

Daniela Mustafa-Quintana

Northshore High School

Slidell

Catherine Tanguis

Amber Lee

Northshore High School

Slidell

Catherine Tanguis

Hannah Moreau

Opelousas High School

Opelousas

Rodney Johnson

Asenath Babineaux

Opelousas High School

Opelousas

Rodney Johnson

Allyssa Mouton

Opelousas High School

Opelousas

Rodney Johnson

Jack Dubreuil

St. Paul's School

Covington

Brother Ray Bulliard

David Durand

St. Paul's School

Covington

Brother Ray Bulliard

Kyle Cleveland

St. Paul's School

Covington

Brother Ray Bulliard

Katelyn McCoy

St. Louis Catholic High School

Lake Charles

Holley Fontenot

Amy LeBleu

St. Louis Catholic High School

Lake Charles

Holley Fontenot

Caterina Cuccio

St. Louis Catholic High School

Lake Charles

Holley Fontenot

Autumn Cormier

St. Louis Catholic High School

Lake Charles

Holley Fontenot

Ainslie Hale

Zachary High School

Zachary

Brittany Perrie

Sean Guillory

individual entry

Lafayette


 

 

 


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
April 10, 2012

Contact:

Paulita Chartier
State Library of Louisiana
225.342.9713
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Jacques Berry
Office of the Lieutenant Governor
225.342.8607
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JUST LISTEN TO YOURSELF: THE LOUISIANA POET LAUREATE PRESENTS LOUISIANA POETS - 2012

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JUST LISTEN TO YOURSELF!
A Dozen Poets for ‘12

In celebration of National Poetry Month and building upon last year’s successful event, the State Library of Louisiana’s Center for the Book announces its second annual program “Just Listen to Yourself: The Louisiana Poet Laureate Presents Louisiana Poets - 2012.”  The event, moderated by Julie Kane, Louisiana Poet Laureate, will be held Wednesday, April 11, 2012, Noon – 1:30 PM, in the Seminar Center of the State Library, 701 North Fourth Street, Baton Rouge.

The poets invited by Kane to join her in reading a selection from their work include Darrell Bourque, Kelly Clayton, Ashley Mace Havird, David Havird, Ava Leavell Haymon, Clemonce Heard, Charles Jolivette, David Middleton, Alison Pelegrin, Michelle Pichon, and Gail White.

The lunchtime program is free and open to the public. Attendees may bring their lunch and come and go as their schedules allow. The State Library of Louisiana is wheelchair accessible.


PRESENTING POETS

Darrell Bourque lives in a bamboo grove in rural St. Landry Parish. A former Louisiana Poet Laureate, university professor, and administrator, he is now a full-time poet with a new book on the way. Megan’s Guitar and Other Poems from Acadie is forthcoming in 2013 from the University of Louisiana Press.

Kelly Clayton is a Louisiana Creole with deep roots in New Orleans, New Roads, Baton Rouge, and Plaquemine. Louisiana’s people, music, and spirit are her muse. Her work has appeared in Future Cycle Poetry, Gloom Cupboard, and The Dead Mule School of Southern Literature. Delacourt Press commissioned a poem as a chapter lead for Do Gentlemen Really Prefer Blondes? by Jena Pincott.

Ashley Mace Havird lives in Shreveport. Her chapbook The Dirt Eaters was published by the South Carolina Poetry Initiative in 2009, and her poems have appeared in journals including The Southern Review, Shenandoah, and The Virginia Quarterly Review. In 2002 she was awarded a Louisiana Division of the Arts Fellowship.

David Havird is a Professor of English at Centenary College in Shreveport. He is the author of Penelope’s Design (2010), which won the 2009 Robert Phillips Poetry Chapbook Prize; and his poems have appeared in Agni, The New Yorker, Poetry, The Sewanee Review, Shenandoah, Southwest Review, and The Yale Review.

Ava Leavell Haymon teaches poetry writing in Baton Rouge and directs a writers’ retreat center in New Mexico. Her most recent book is Why the House Is Made of Gingerbread, from LSU Press. She holds the 2003 Louisiana Literature Prize, the 2010 L. E. Phillabaum Award, and the 2010 Mississippi Institute of Arts and Letters Award.

Clemonce Heard is a 23-year-old native of New Orleans who is majoring in Graphic Design and minoring in Culinary Arts at Northwestern State University in Natchitoches. He is the founder and President of NSU’s Brainy Acts Poetry Society, a student organization that puts on poetry slams.

Charles Jolivette grew up in San Francisco with deep Louisiana Creole roots. Following a 13-year career as the recording artist Rap4rights, he wrote two novels, Etouffé and Le Midnight Roux. He will release a poetry collection, While the Gumbo Cools, this year.

Julie Kane, the current Louisiana Poet Laureate, lives in Natchitoches and teaches at Northwestern State University. Her last two books are Jazz Funeral (2009), which won the Donald Justice Poetry Prize, and Rhythm & Booze (2003), which won the National Poetry Series. Garrison Keillor has read two of her poems on The Writer’s Almanac.

David Middleton is Professor Emeritus of English at Nicholls State University in Thibodaux. His holds the 2006 Allen Tate Award from The Sewanee Review and the 2006 Louisiana Governor’s Award for Outstanding Professional Artist. The Fiddler of Driskoll Hill: Poems of Louisiana North and South is forthcoming from LSU Press in 2013.

Alison Pelegrin teaches at Southeastern Louisiana University in Hammond. Her two most recent poetry collections are Hurricane Party (2011) and Big Muddy River of Stars (2011), both from the University of Akron Press. The recipient of an NEA Fellowship in creative writing, she has published poems in Poetry, Ploughshares, and Image.

Michelle Pichon lives in the Cane River community of Isle Brevelle. Her family, with ties to both Cane River and Slidell, is of Creole heritage and has been part of Louisiana since Louisiana’s existence. She strives to give a modern voice to a culture so rich in history.

Gail White writes her poems on the banks of Bayou Teche in Breaux Bridge. She has edited three anthologies and published three books of poetry, the latest being The Accidental Cynic (2009), a winner of the Anita Dorn Memorial Award. Her new chapbook is Sonnets in a Hostile World.

www.LouisianaTravel.com

 


 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
MARCH 21, 2012

Contact:

Paulita Chartier
State Library of Louisiana
225.342.9713
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Jacques Berry
Office of the Lieutenant Governor
225.342.8607
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FREDDI WILLIAMS EVANS AND CONGO SQUARE: AFRICAN ROOTS IN NEW ORLEANS

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CELEBRATING BLACK HISTORY MONTH
FREDDI WILLIAMS EVANS AND CONGO SQUARE: AFRICAN ROOTS IN NEW ORLEANS

EvansFreddiWilliams_web
Tuesday, Feb. 7, noon
State Library of Louisiana
Seminar Center, 1st Floor
701 N. Fourth St.
Baton Rouge, LA

In celebration of Black History Month, the Louisiana Center for the Book in the State Library of Louisiana is announcing a special event. Author, researcher, scholar and educator Freddi Williams Evans is presenting her book Congo Square: African Roots in New Orleans on Tuesday, Feb.7, from noon to 12:45 p.m., in the Seminar Center of the State Library of Louisiana. A book signing will follow, with copies of the book available for purchase.

CongoSquareBookThe State Library strives to promote literature and an appreciation for literature. This state is fortunate in its wealth of a truly rich, unique culture that is in turn spun into stories by legendary storytellers. The LCB finds and brings these talented artists to our stage, where they tell our stories, no matter the medium of the message. Through the Louisiana Center for the Book in the State Library of Louisiana, citizens from all walks of life are able to immerse themselves in the consistently fine literary programming offered, free of charge, to those who care to share the bounty.

Through her book, Congo Square: African Roots in New Orleans, Evans will share the story of historic Congo Square through archival materials including audio and video clips, photographs, sketches, maps and musical instruments. The author will also highlight connections among cultural practices witnessed in Congo Square and those found in parts of Africa, Haiti and Cuba as well as Congo Square's influence on the indigenous culture of New Orleans.

The presentation is free and open to the public and registration is not required. With this program planned as a lunchtime event, attendees are welcomed to bring a brown bag lunch.

 

www.crt.la.gov

 


 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
January 23, 2012

Contact:

Paulita Chartier
State Library of Louisiana
225.342.9713   
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STATE LIBRARY OF LOUISIANA SIGNS STATEWIDE LICENSING AGREEMENT WITH CREDO REFERENCE

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Lt. Governor Jay Dardenne is announcing that the State Library of Louisiana and LOUIS, the Louisiana Library Network, have signed an agreement to partner with Credo Reference to provide reference and research assistance statewide.

The agreement ensures that students, faculty, researchers and patrons at all Louisiana academic, public and K – 12 libraries will have access to hundreds of highly-regarded reference titles that compose Credo General Reference. The agreement also includes more than 10,000 Credo topic pages that will be customized to encourage discovery and exploration by students and faculty.

“One of the goals of the State Library is to partner with other state agencies to combine purchasing and save taxpayer dollars.” Lt. Governor Jay Dardenne said. “Our statewide purchase of educational databases for public libraries already provides a 13-to-1 cost savings for taxpayers. Therefore this new agreement falls in line with our mission and allows us to do more with less.”

Credo Reference offers completely customizable, “best-in-class” reference collections for libraries. With its unique cross-referencing technology, Credo’s General Reference service effortlessly delivers authoritative answers to millions of researchers worldwide.

“As part of its mission, the State Library provides services to all public libraries in Louisiana equally. In a tough economy, this agreement will help us provide rich content to every resident in the state at no cost.” State Librarian Rebecca Hamilton said. “In addition, the agreement allows access to Credo from K-12 libraries that would otherwise not have these reference resources. “

For more information about available reference resources, visit www.state.lib.la.us/.

www.crt.la.gov


 

 

State Library Launches Louisiana Teen Video Challenge

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The State Library of Louisiana is partnering with the Collaborative Summer Library Program to launch the 2012 Louisiana Teen Video Challenge, the state qualifier for a national competition that encourages teens to get involved with reading and their public libraries’ summer reading program. The contest is an opportunity for teens to showcase their creativity and have their ideas heard before a national audience

To enter, contestants must create 30-to-90-second videos with their unique interpretation of the 2012 summer reading slogan “Own the Night” in the context of reading and libraries. The program’s goal is to involve teens in the process so they are more aware of reading throughout the year.

Creators of the winning state video will be awarded $275 and their associated public library will receive prizes worth $150. All prizes are provided by the CSLP. The winning video from each state or territory will be named as one of the CSLP 2012 Teen Videos, promoting summer reading nationwide. Winners will be announced in spring 2012.

The CSLP is a grassroots consortium of 50 states, Washington D.C., American Samoa and the Northern Mariana Islands working together to provide children, teens and families with a summer reading program and promotional materials for public libraries.

For full details about the contest, visit www.state.lib.la.us and search for 2012 Video Challenge. To view the 2011 winning videos visit, http://www.cslpreads.org/winners.html.

www.crt.la.gov


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
December 7, 2011

Contact:

Paulita Chartier
State Library of Louisiana
225.342.9713   
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Jacques Berry
Office of the Lieutenant Governor
225.342.8607
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Letters About Literature Call For Entries

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The Louisiana Center for the Book in the State Library of Louisiana, in partnership with the Louisiana Writing Project, proudly announces its third consecutive year as state sponsor of Letters About Literature, a national reading-writing contest for students.

The Center for the Book in the Library of Congress, in partnership with Target Corporation and affiliate state centers for the book, annually invites readers in grades four through 12 to enter the Letters About Literature competition.

With the involvement of teachers, librarians, parents, the Louisiana Writing Project, and most importantly the participating students themselves, last year’s sponsorship of Letters About Literature by the Louisiana Center for the Book resulted in an amazing 1,097 entries, up from 42 entries in 2008 before the Center was a sponsor..

“We are so pleased with the increase in student participation in Letters About Literature since the Louisiana Center for the Book became a sponsor two years ago,” said State Librarian Rebecca Hamilton. “This particular program is an exceptional way for us to encourage our youth to read; and because participation in the contest requires reflective reading, the contest emphasizes the personal rewards to be gained from the reading experience.”

To enter, the student reader writes a personal letter to an author, living or dead, from any genre--fiction, nonfiction, or poetry, contemporary or classic--explaining how that author's work, whether book, short story, poem, essay, or speech, changed the reader's way of thinking about the world or themselves. The submission, in the form of a personal letter rather than a book report or fan letter, should express how the chosen book has impacted the reader’s life or worldview.

There are three competition levels: Level I for students in grades 4-6, Level II for grades 7-8 and Level III, grades 9-12. Entrants must be 9 years of age or older as of 9/1/11.  Grade levels refer to the 2011-12 school year.

The Letters About Literature contest is now open, and submissions must be sent directly to the national Letters About Literature address (Guidelines Individual 2012.pdf), postmarked by Friday, Jan. 6, 2012, and received by LAL Central no later than Tuesday, January 17, 2012.  Submissions inappropriately sent to the Louisiana Center for the Book will not be forwarded or returned.  See Official Rules for detailed information, national mailing address, and required entry coupon to be attached to each entry. Further information and detailed guidelines for Letters About Literature and the required downloadable entry coupon may be found at www.lettersaboutliterature.org (How to Enter).  Teachers and Librarians: see the specific attached instructions or website instructions regarding group submissions.  Individuals: Home schooled students and other individuals entering on their own are encouraged to also participate using the individual form, attached and available on the website.

LAL Central, the national Letters About Literature team, will choose the top 30-50 entries in each competition level from each state.  From these, a panel of Louisiana judges, primarily composed of Louisiana language arts teachers and librarians chosen in partnership with the Louisiana Writing Project, will choose a first, second, and third place winner for each grade level on or about March 15, to be announced as soon as possible thereafter.  State honorable mentions may be awarded at the sole discretion of the state judges.  The letters by the state first-place winners for each competition level are sent back to LAL Central where they are then in the running for the national awards.

State first-place winners will each receive a $50 Target GiftCard through the national organization.  Additionally, in Louisiana for the 2012 contest, winners in each competition level will receive $100 for first place, $75 for second place, and $50 for third place, made possible by a grant from Target Corporation.

National winners, announced in late April, receive additional prizes and earn for their community or school or library LAL Reading Promotion Grants valued at thousands of dollars.  For the upcoming 2012 contest, six National Winners will each receive a $500 Target GiftCard and will secure a $10,000 LAL Reading Promotion Grant in his/her name for a community or school library.  Twelve National Honorable Mention Winners will receive a $100 Target GiftCard and also secure for a school or community library a $1,000 LAL Reading Promotion Grant in his/her name.

Louisiana language arts teachers, school librarians, public children’s and YA librarians, and home school parents/instructors are encouraged to visit the Letters About Literature website for more information and lessons plans, and to incorporate the Letters About Literature into their curriculum and programming to facilitate Louisiana youth’s participation in and representation of our state in this rewarding reading and writing activity.

Lesson Plans: The Library of Congress provides free teaching materials, including lesson plans, writing samples, assessment checklists, and teacher tips--all downloadable through its website, www.lettersaboutliterature.org .

LAL focuses on reader response and reflective writing and supports educational standards established for reading and language arts as recommended by the International Reading Association and the National Council for the Teaching of English.

www.crt.la.gov

 


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
December 1, 2011

Contact:

Paulita Chartier
State Library of Louisiana
225.342.9713   
This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Jacques Berry
Office of the Lieutenant Governor
225.342.8607
This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

 


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